Posts in category: What's On

Alfresco on The Roseland

13 Mar 2017

The Roseland offers some great impromptu alfresco experiences and we always know “the season” has commenced when these venues are back up and running.  A couple of our favourites are:

 

THE THIRSTEA CO.

Earl, the vintage Citroen Van is pitched at the National Trust’s Porth Farm.  This is on the circular walk around St Anthony’s Head and just a few yards up the path from the unspoilt Towan Beach.  There are toilets and plenty of car parking just across the road.  The food ranges from warm Cornish pasties, freshly filled rolls and a wonderful variety of homemade cakes and bakes.  They also have fresh scones, served with Rodda’s clotted Cream and locally made strawberry jam.  We love picking up some freshly made treats and wandering down to the beach, to make the most of this beautiful stretch of Cornish coast.

For more information visit: http://www.thethirsteacompany.co.uk/

 

MISS V’S TEA HUT

Miss V’s Tea Hut can be found beside the 13th century St Just in Roseland Church, with its glorious views across the Carrick Roads over to Mylor Harbour.  Nestled amongst semi-tropical gardens on the river bank of the Fal Estuary, and based along the coastal path to St Mawes, this pit stop is a very special place.  Once again, there is ample car parking and toilets close by.  We love to come here to visit this unique churchyard with its intriguing paths, before succumbing to a scrumptious piece of cake or Cornish cream tea.

For more information visit: https://twitter.com/missvscreamtea?lang=en

Caerhays

11 Feb 2017

 

Just five miles south of Mevagissey and overlooking Porthluney Cove, lies the spectacular Caerhays, winner of the 2016 Garden of the Year Award (Historic Houses Association).  We always begin to think about this unique place in February, when the spring gardens re-open to the public until June.  They are internationally renowned for the largest collection of magnolias in England and containing one of four National Magnolia Collections (National Council for the Conservation of Plants and Gardens).  A couple of years ago, when we first visited the 140 acre estate, we were bowled over, not only by the spring-time wonderland but by the stunning views of the nearby coastline and steep valleys.  It must be one of the most special and tranquil places on the south Cornish coast.

 

The gardens originated from the work of plant hunters in China at the start of the 20th century and the castle itself was designed by the famous Regency architect John Nash around 200 years ago.  Both the building and the two families who have lived and worked at Caerhays have played significant roles in the history of Cornwall and its former tin mining industry.

 

For details of opening times visit: http://www.caerhays.co.uk/page.cfm?page=open_rates

Showing : 2